Internet dating article

consistent with the sharp increase in interracial marriages in the U. in the last two decades."2013 data from the National Academy of Sciences, they also discovered that marriages created online were less likely to break up within the first year, while such partners reported a higher degree of satisfaction, too. (Credit: Josué Ortega, Philipp Hergovich) Last month, the pair published their findings in an online article, entitled "The Strength of Absent Ties: Social Integration via Online Dating," through the electronic archive and distribution server ar Xiv.  In the weeks since, the work has been gaining attention around the world, and brought the theoretical researchers into the spotlight.Hergovich commented by email that as intriguing as he and his colleagues found their work to be, "none of us saw that [public attention] coming." He continued, "Working with a close friend is always fun, but the big media echo surprised me.As online dating matures, however, it is likely that more and more people will avail themselves of these services, and if development — and use — of these sites is guided by rigorous psychological science, they may become a more promising way for people to meet their perfect partners. Finkel discuss the science behind online dating at the 24th APS Annual Convention.

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With the help of researchers and data hounds across several continents, they concluded, "When a society benefits from previously absent ties, social integration occurs rapidly, even if the number of partners met online is small ... marriages over time, including rises from the projected increase surrounding the creation of Match.com, Ok Cupid, and Tinder.

That's been especially true for the queer community, he noted, and for older people looking for a partner.

While many have worried about the long-term potential of dating apps and sites, research suggests that such tools may actually be helping more people to get together in new ways, and for good.

Hergovich commented by email that as intriguing as he and his colleagues found their work to be, "none of us saw that [public attention] coming." He continued, "Working with a close friend is always fun, but the big media echo surprised me.

When I saw our names in the print version of the Ortega said their work has received media interest reaching from Australia and the UK to Japan and Peru, but that he's also seen a number of heartening, very personal responses to their findings.

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